Research paints an alarming picture of species extinctions worldwide, wildlife population declines, habitat loss, and depletion of ecosystem services − adding to the existing wealth of evidence that we are degrading our global commons at a dramatic and unsustainable rate.

A very positive step to improve matters is to make biochar for a garden or farm. The Ithaka Institute in Switzerland developed an easily replicated kiln called the Kon Tiki. The modified kiln is helping improve very degraded soil fertility at Lost Glacier

One million species are at the risk of extinction and 90 percent of land has been significantly altered, threatening the lives and livelihoods of millions of people. Protecting biodiversity has gone from being an environmental issue, to a development, economic and moral issue.

The new Dasgupta report paints a stark picture: The world needs to fundamentally overhaul how society measures economic success if it is to stem the rapid decline of biodiversity that threatens civilization itself as our demands on nature far exceed its capacity to supply them, putting biodiversity under huge pressure and society at “extreme risk.”

 

Biochar

For thousands of years people have been producing biochar with open fire. Here we use a modified Kon-Tiki flame curtain kiln. In this way we use ancient techniques of fire making combined with modern thermodynamics to produce high quality char with low emissions.

Kon Tiki style biochar

For thousands of years people have been producing biochar with open fire. Here we use a modified Kon-Tiki flame curtain kiln. In this way we use ancient techniques of fire making combined with modern thermodynamics to produce high quality char with low emissions.